2020ok  Directory of FREE Online Books and FREE eBooks

Free eBooks > Computers & Internet > Certification Central > Subjects > Networking > Computer Networking A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet

Computer Networking A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet

by James F. Kurose and Keith W. Ross

Download Book

If you are the author or the publisher, and would like to link to your site here, please contact us.

About Book

Certain data-communication protocols hog the spotlight, but all of them have a lot in common. Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet explains the engineering problems that are inherent in communicating digital information from point to point. The top-down approach mentioned in the subtitle means that the book starts at the top of the protocol stack--at the application layer--and works its way down through the other layers, until it reaches bare wire.

The authors, for the most part, shun the well-known seven-layer Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) protocol stack in favor of their own five-layer (application, transport, network, link, and physical) model. It's an effective approach that helps clear away some of the hand waving traditionally associated with the more obtuse layers in the OSI model. The approach is definitely theoretical--don't look here for instructions on configuring Windows 2000 or a Cisco router--but it's relevant to reality, and should help anyone who needs to understand networking as a programmer, system architect, or even administration guru.

The treatment of the network layer, at which routing takes place, is typical of the overall style. In discussing routing, authors James Kurose and Keith Ross explain (by way of lots of clear, definition-packed text) what routing protocols need to do: find the best route to a destination. Then they present the mathematics that determine the best path, show some code that implements those algorithms, and illustrate the logic by using excellent conceptual diagrams. Real-life implementations of the algorithms--including Internet Protocol (both IPv4 and IPv6) and several popular IP routing protocols--help you to make the transition from pure theory to networking technologies. --David Wall

Topics covered: The theory behind data networks, with thorough discussion of the problems that are posed at each level (the application layer gets plenty of attention). For each layer, there's academic coverage of networking problems and solutions, followed by discussion of real technologies. Special sections deal with network security and transmission of digital multimedia.

Book Description

Computer Networking provides a top-down approach to this study by beginning with applications-level protocols and then working down the protocol stack. Focuses on a specific motivating example of a network-the Internet-as well as introducing students to protocols in a more theoretical context. New short "interlude" on "putting it all together" that follows the coverage of application, transport, network, and datalink layers ties together the various components of the Internet architecture and identifying aspects of the architecture that have made the Internet so successful. A new chapter covers wireless and mobile networking, including in-depth coverage of Wi-Fi, Mobile IP and GSM. Also included is expanded coverage on BGP, wireless security and DNS. This book is designed for readers who need to learn the fundamentals of computer networking. It also has extensive material, on the very latest technology, making it of great interest to networking professionals.

Book Info
Explains the engineering problems that are inherent in communicating digital information from point to point. Introduces the underlying principles of networking while at the same time emphasizing Internet protocols and network applications.

From the Publisher
Networking is much more than dry standards specifying message formats and protocol behaviors. Kurose and Ross focus on teaching the emerging principles of the field and then illustrate these principles with examples drawn from Internet architecture. The discussion is lively, engaging, topical, and up-to-date.

This book features a top-down organization with an early emphasis on applications. Studying application-level protocols first allows students to gain an intuitive feel for network protocols. The focus on application-layer paradigms (e.g., client server) and application programming interfaces allows students to get their "hands dirty" early-studying and implementing protocols in the context of applications they use daily. Proceeding though the layered network architecture in a top-down manner, one can first focus on the network services that are needed and then, in turn, study how these services can be provided.

This book provides a modern treatment of computer networking. 20 years ago, the HDLC protocol was considered "high-level." Today, there is an emphasis on services, applications and their transport needs, scalability, heterogeneity, performance, security, and manageability. This emphasis, which is driving today's advances, is woven throughout the book.

Each copy of this book comes with a prepaid six-month subscription to a companion website. This site includes the full text with an advanced searching feature and a hyper-linked index, Java applets to help demonstrate difficult concepts, links to up-to-date material, and complete supplements for qualified instructors of courses.

From the Back Cover
The most up-to-date introduction to the field of computer networking, this book's top-down approach starts at the application layer and works down the protocol stack. It also uses the Internet as the main example of networks. This all creates a book relevant to those interested in networking today. By starting at the application-layer and working down the protocol stack, this book provides a relevant introduction of important concepts. Based on the rationale that once a reader understands the applications of networks they can understand the network services needed to support these applications, this book takes a "top-down" approach that exposes readers first to a concrete application and then draws into some of the deeper issues surrounding networking. This book focuses on the Internet as opposed to addressing it as one of many computer network technologies, further motivating the study of the material. This book is designed for programmers who need to learn the fundamentals of computer networking. It also has extensive material making it of great interest to networking professionals.

About the Author

Jim Kurose is currently a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts. He is the eight-time recipient of the Outstanding Teacher Award from the National Technological University, the recipient of the Outstanding Teacher Award from the college of Natural Science and Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts, and the recipient of the 1996 Outstanding Teaching Award of the Northeast Association of Graduate Schools. He has been the recipient of a GE Fellowship, an IBM faculty Development Award, and a Lilly Teaching Fellowship.

Dr. Kurose is a former Editor-In-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Communications and of the IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. He is active in the program committees for IEEE Informcom, ACM SIGCOMM, and ACM SIGMETRICS. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Columbia University.

Keith Ross is the Leonard Shustek Chaired Professor in the Computer Science Department at Polytechnic University. He has previously been a professor at both Eurécom Institute in France and the University of Pennsylvania. In 1999, he co-founded the Internet startup Wimba.com.

Dr. Ross has published over 50 papers and written two books. He has served on editorial boards of five major journals, and has served on the program committees of major networking conferences, including IEEE Infocom and ACM SIGCOMM. He has supervised more than 10 Ph.D. theses. His research and teaching interests include multimedia networking, asynchronous learning, Web catching, streaming audio and video, and traffic modeling. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.


the book is really useful for most of the network engineers.
good book I am using it now!
Book is realy use full and written in a more understading friendly manner


PLEASE READ: All comments must be approved before appearing in the thread; time and space constraints prevent all comments from appearing. We will only approve comments that are directly related to the article, use appropriate language and are not attacking the comments of others.

Message (please, no HTML tags. Web addresses will be hyperlinked):

Related Free eBooks

Related Tags

DIGG This story   Save To Google   Save To Windows Live   Save To Del.icio.us   diigo it   Save To blinklist
Save To Furl   Save To Yahoo! My Web 2.0   Save To Blogmarks   Save To Shadows   Save To stumbleupon   Save To Reddit