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The Phantom Ship

by Frederick Marryat

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About Book

Alexander Kent
"This was Marryat's navy, his world, and no one brings it to us with greater authenticity."

Virginia Woolf
"Marryat has the power to set us in the midst of ships and men and sea and sky all vivid, credible, authentic."

Joseph Conrad
". . . [Marryat's] greatness is undeniable"

Library Journal
"When all your Patrick O'Brians are out, recommend Marryat."

Book Description
1896. Marryat, English novelist who began writing after a distinguished career in the British Navy. The Phantom Ship is the tale of Philip Vanderdecken's search for his cursed father and the Dutchman's ghostly crew. Maritime legend holds that a spectral ship, The Flying Dutchman, haunts the seas around the Cape of Good Hope. Philip Vanderdecken's father is the captain of that ship, condemned to sail and torment sailors until the Day of Judgment. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

About the Author
A master of the sea tale, Marryat wrote novels that deal with life in the English Navy, in which he himself served. His stories were written for children but were read by old and young alike. "Masterman Ready" (1841) at one time stood next to "Robinson Crusoe" in popularity with boy readers. "Peter Simple" (1834) is the most autobiographical of the novels, "Mr. Midshipman Easy" (1836), the most humorous. "Percival Keene" (1842), the least estimable of his heroes, is a melodramatic story. "The Little Savage" (1848) is a horror tale of remarkable power, strong in plot and character development. Marryat's novels are all didactic, but his moral lessons never intrude or offend. The details of his adventurous life, so far as they are known, are well described in Oliver Warner's "Captain Marryat: A Rediscovery." "A Diary in America" appeared first in 1839. The recognition now given to Marryat as a source for social history is fully deserved, since his opinionated account of his journey gives us "an invaluable view of American life at the time when Jacksonian democracy was in full development in the new nation."



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