2020ok  Directory of FREE Online Books and FREE eBooks

Free eBooks > Literature & Fiction > World Literature > United States > Classics > Wharton, Edith > In Morocco

In Morocco

by Edith Wharton

Download Book
(Respecting the intellectual property of others is utmost important to us, we make every effort to make sure we only link to legitimate sites, such as those sites owned by authors and publishers. If you have any questions about these links, please contact us.)

link 1
link 2

About Book

From Library Journal
During her travels in Morocco in 1917, Wharton kept a rather complete, descriptive account of her experiences. As expected of such a superbly talented author, her observations are well written and interesting. While this gives listeners a real feel for desert living and tribes, it does not include a map, which would have been helpful in following and better understanding her journey. Wharton provides some historical perspective and unusual insight into the travel of that period and into the lives of women. Her account of visits to harems provide the most educational and fascinating listening. Anna Fields reads beautifully, gliding through a great many difficult names, making only one detectable pronunciation error. Unfortunately, old travel books normally attract a rather limited audience. True armchair travelers or those with a special interest in Morocco may be interested. Libraries seeking older verbal travelogs should consider.
-Carolyn Alexander, Brigadoon Lib., Salinas, CA
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From AudioFile
Armchair travelers and history buffs will delight in this recording. Wharton's language alternates between unimpassioned frankness and voluptuous description of Morocco's staggering natural and cultural beauty. Anna Fields takes her cue from the text, delivering a clipped and assured reading when Wharton discusses conveyance, history and other mundane matters, and an unhurried, even dreamy, reading of Wharton's sensuous and evocative descriptions. Those who have visited or lived in Morocco will feel immediately transported to familiar sites during these descriptive passages. The listening experience is made the more interesting because Wharton's account was written during one month of travel in the final year of WW I and first published eight decades ago. More recent travelers, who will discover much that is familiar here, are likely to enjoy the description more than the recitation of history. T.B. (c) AudioFile, Portland, Maine

Book Description
Having begun my book with the statement that Morocco still lacks a guide-book, I should have wished to take a first step toward remedying that deficiency.

Download Description
We passed through a gate and were confronted by other ramparts. Then we entered an outskirt of dusty red lanes bordered by clay hovels with draped figures slinking by like ghosts. After that more walls, more gates, more endlessly winding lanes, more gates again, more turns, a dusty open space with donkeys and camels and negroes; a final wall with a great door under a lofty arch--and suddenly we were in the palace of the Bahia, among flowers and shadows and falling water.

About the Author
Edith Wharton(1862-1937) was born into a distinguished New York family and was educated privately in the United States and abroad. Among her best-known work is Ethan Frome (1911), which is considered her greatest tragic story, The House of Mirth (1905), and The Age of Innocence (1920), for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize.



PLEASE READ: All comments must be approved before appearing in the thread; time and space constraints prevent all comments from appearing. We will only approve comments that are directly related to the article, use appropriate language and are not attacking the comments of others.

Message (please, no HTML tags. Web addresses will be hyperlinked):

Related Free eBooks

Related Tags

DIGG This story   Save To Google   Save To Windows Live   Save To Del.icio.us   diigo it   Save To blinklist
Save To Furl   Save To Yahoo! My Web 2.0   Save To Blogmarks   Save To Shadows   Save To stumbleupon   Save To Reddit