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Celt And Saxon

by George Meredith

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Book Description
1911. Celt and Saxon, an early and unfinished work, has resemblances to Meredith's most popular and critically acclaimed novel, Diana of the Crossways, in particular in its criticism of English temperament. Contents: Wherein an Excursion is made in a Celtic Mind; Mr. Adister; Caroline; The Princess; At the Piano, chiefly without Music; A Consultation: with Opinions upon Welshwomen and the Cambrian Race; The Miniature; Captain Con and Mrs. Adister O'Donnell; The Captain's Cabin; The Brothers; Introducing a New Character; Miss Mattock; The Dinner-Party; Of Rockney; The Mattock Family; Of the great Mr. Bull and the Celtic and Saxon view of him: and something of Richard Rockney; Crossing the Rubicon; Captain Con's Letter; and Mars Convalescent.

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A young Irish gentleman of the numerous clan O'Donnells, and a Patrick, hardly a distinction of him until we know him, had bound himself, by purchase of a railway-ticket, to travel direct to the borders of North Wales, on a visit to a notable landowner of those marches, the Squire Adister, whose family-seat was where the hills begin to lift and spy into the heart of black mountains. Examining his ticket with an apparent curiosity, the son of a greener island debated whether it would not be better for him to follow his inclinations, now that he had gone so far as to pay for the journey, and stay.



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