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Framley Parsonage

by Anthony Trollope

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Book Description
Framley Parsonage (1861) by Anthony Trollope is one of the charming series of loosely connected novels set in Barsetshire. This is the fourth book to appear in the series, but may be read as a standalone work, and enjoyed on its own merits.

The new vicar, naïve and generous Mark Robarts, is embroiled in a sticky financial situation when he is preyed upon by Mr. Sowerby who convinces him to lend money. Meanwhile, the vicar's sister Lucy falls in love with his dear friend Lord Lufton, and as a result falls under the sharp scrutiny of Lady Lufton, the young Lord's highly discriminating mother.

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It will be necessary that I should say a word or two of some of the people named in the few preceding pages, and also of the localities in which they lived. Of Lady Lufton herself enough, perhaps, has been written to introduce her to my readers. The Framley property belonged to her son; but as Lufton Park--an ancient ramshackle place in another county--had heretofore been the family residence of the Lufton family.

The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature
Novel by Anthony Trollope, published serially from January 1860 to April 1861 and in three volumes in 1861, the fourth of his six BARSETSHIRE NOVELS.

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About the Author
Anthony Trollope, 1815-1885 Novelist Anthony Trollope was born the fourth son of Thomas Anthony Trollope, a barrister, and Frances Trollope in London, England. At the age of one, he was taken to a house called Julians. He attended many famous schools but as a large, awkward boy, he never felt in place among the aristocrats he met there. In 1835, his father Thomas Anthony died. In 1834, he became a junior clerk in the General Post Office, London. He spent seven years there in poverty until his transfer, in 1841, to Banagher, Ireland as a deputy postal surveyor. He became more financially secure and in 1844, he married Rose Heseltine. Trollope wanted to discover the reasons for Irish discontent. In 1843, he began working on his first novel "The Macdermots of Ballycloran" which was published in 1847. He was sent on many postal missions. He spent a year is Belfast, in 1853, then went to Donnybrook, near Dublin. He also went to Egypt, Scotland and the West Indies to finally settle outside of London, at Waltham Cross, as a surveyor general in the Post Office. At this point, he was writing constantly. Some of the writings during this time were "The Noble Jilt" (written in 1850), a comedy that was set aside; "Barchester Towers" (1857), which chronicled the events and politics in the imaginary city; and "The Last Chronicle of Barset." In 1867, he tried editorship of St. Paul's Magazine but soon gave up because he didn't feel suited for the job. In 1871, he went on a visit to a son in Australia. At sea, he wrote "Lady Anna" on the voyage out and "Australia and New Zealand" on the voyage back. The "Autobiography" was written between October 1875 and April 1876 but was not published until after his death. Suffering from asthma and possible angina pectoris, Trollope moved to Harting Grange. He wrote three more novels during 1881 than, in 1882, went to Ireland to begin research for "The Landleaguers". In November that year, he suffered a paralytic stroke and on December 6, 1882, he died. His wife and two sons survived him.



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